Tag: health facts Friday

Cervical Health Awareness Month

It’s Cervical Health Awareness Month!  A 2019 CDC study showed that the HPV vaccine that has become widely available is reducing cervical pre-cancer. Women who had received the HPV vaccine had the most drastic decrease in pre-cancers, but unvaccinated women showed a decline as well. Without further study, the cause of decline in unvaccinated women cannot be explained, but a possibility is herd protection (or immunity). For those who remember our flu shot health fact from October 18, herd immunity is the protection a population gains from disease because many of the individuals are immune to it. Essentially, it is difficult for viruses to be transmitted when many people are immune, which results in those who are not immune having protection due to the immunity of those around them. Infection-based cancers, like cervical cancer that can develop due to HPV, are particularly concerning for people living with HIV/AIDS, as compromised immune systems make contraction more likely. There is also research to suggest that a small number of people living with both HIV and HPV develop cervical cancer more rapidly. Unfortunately, the reason for this is not yet well understood, and more research is needed. Regular gynecological visits are important to maintain cervical health and prevent infection!

Infographic references

  1. www.who.int/gho/hiv/en/
  2. www.pri.org/stories/2012-12-02/infographic-cancer-deaths-vs-funding-low-and-middle-income-countries
  3. www.unicef.org/wca/press-releases/200000-girls-senegal-be-protected-year-against-cervical-cancer
  4. www.cdc.gov/cancer/hpv/statistics/cases.htm
  5. Pinkribbonredribbon.org/the-double-burden-hiv-and-cervical-cancer-webinar-with-the-international-aids-society/
  6. https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(07)61050-2/fulltext
  7. https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/human-papillomavirus-(hpv)-and-cervical-cancer

An infographic titled Cervical Cancer and HIV
36.9 million people worldwide have HIV. $6.2 billion is spent annually on HIV/AIDS related healthcare. (a superscript 2 provides which source this information was taken from)
Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women. 311,000 women dies each year worldwide. (a superscript 3 provides source number)
90 percent of cervical cancer is caused by the HPV virus. If caught in time, cervical cancer is 100 percent preventable. (superscript 4 provides source number)
Up to 75 percent of HIV positive women also have HPV putting them at risk for developing cervical cancer. (superscript 5 provides source number)
HIV positive women are 5 times more likely to develop cervical cancer. (superscript 6 provides source number)
Cervical cancer progresses twice as quickly in HIV positive women. (superscript 7 provides source number)
Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

Teeth and Nutrition

Nutrition and teeth go hand in hand. We often hear about the foods to avoid for healthy teeth: sugary and sticky foods. Avoiding these foods, and practicing oral hygiene help teeth stay functional and pain-free.  It is also important to keep in mind that healthy teeth are necessary for proper nutrition. Many of the nutrient rich foods require healthy, strong teeth to eat. For people with chronic diseases that have oral effects, it is important to pay attention to oral hygiene, including visiting dental professionals. FIGHT Family Dentistry offers many dental care services (http://bit.ly/35CfBeT), particularly for people with anxiety around dental visits and those who do not have regular dental appointments.

For Dos and Don’ts of oral care, you can visit our blog for the complete infographic at http://bit.ly/2uw1A5D

For more nutrition info, join us on January 24 for a webinar all about nutrition!

This infographic is from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Visit eatright.org for more information on healthful eating or to find a registered dietitian nutritionist.

Infographic titled Nutrition and Oral Health: the Root of It All

Registered dieticians at the Academy of Nutrition and Dieticians recognize a link between mouth health and nutrition. Oral infectious diseases, as well as acute, chronic and terminal illnesses with oral symptoms can impact not only our ability to consume food properly, but also our health and nutrition status.

For many, an annual dental exam is a luxury. The top 10 stated with the highest percentage of dental visits: Utah, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Hawai’i, New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New Jersey. 72% on average have health insurance. Bottom 10 states with the lowest % of dental visits: Texas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Kentucky. 56% on average have health insurance.

New section titled Oral Health Issues in Older Adults (65+ years)

1 in 3  have untreated dental issues

40% have periodontal (gum) disease.

2 times more likely to be toothless if living in poverty.

25% have no natural teeth and instead use dentures or implants.

New section titled Oral Health Issues in children (2-4 years)

Tooth decay has increased, with significantly more reported among non-hispanic black and Mexican American children. 18 % in 1988-1994 and 24% in 1995-2004.

New section

The Don’ts: 

  1. Don’t regularly sip on sugar-sweetened or carbonated drinks.
  2. don’t overly consume sticky foods or slow-dissolving candies.
  3. Don’t frequently eat desserts or other sugary foods.

The Do’s:

  1. Do maintain a healthy diet of fruits and vegetables, lean protein, low-fat dairy products and whole grains that provide essential nutrients.
  2. Do practice good oral hygiene (i.e. brushing your teeth with fluoridated toothpaste twice a day; drinking fluoridated water; and seeking regular oral health care).

Oral health care and nutrition is about education, but the collaboration between patients, dentists and registered dietitians can prevent and alleviate a lot of common dental problems- and offer better health to boot!

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/hff/" rel="tag">HFF</a> Leave a comment

International Day for People with Disabilities

December 3rd is the International Day for People with Disabilities. 61 million adults in the United States live with disabilities, which is 1 in 4 people. Adults older than 65, non-Hispanic Native Americans/Alaskan Natives, and women are more likely to have at least one disability. Americans with disabilities are more likely to smoke, have heart disease, and diabetes than non-disabled Americans. 1 in 3 of those 61 million people with disabilities do not have a regular healthcare provider and have unmet medical needs due to cost of treatment. Access to healthcare is an important part of having a good quality of life, and Americans with disabilities can be vulnerable to the consequences of barriers to healthcare access. More information can be found at the CDC website: http://bit.ly/34vttI0

Infographic titled Disability Impacts All of Us

61 million adults in the United States live with a disability

26% (1 in 4) of the adults in the United States have some type of disability, the percentage of people living with disabilities is the highest in the South

Percentage of adults with functional disability types:

13.7% mobility: serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs

10.8% cognition: serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions

6.8% independent living: difficulty doing errands alone

5.9% hearing: deafness or serious difficulty hearing

4.6% vision: blindness or serious difficulty seeing

3.7% self-care: difficulty dressing or bathing

Disability and Communities

Disability is especially common in these groups:

2 in 5 adults age 65 years and older have a disability

1 in 4 women have a disability

2 in 5 Non-Hispanic American Indians/Alaskan Natives have a disability

Section titled Disability and Health

Adults living with disabilities are more likely to have obesity (38.2% for people with disabilities compared to 26.2% of people without), smoke (28.2% compared to 13.4%), have heart disease (11.5% compared to 3.8%), and have diabetes (16.3% compared to 7.2%)

Section titled Disability and Healthcare Access

Healthcare access barriers for working-age adults include

1 in 3 do not have a usual healthcare provider

1 in 3 have an unmet healthcare need because of cost in the past year

1 in 4 did not have a routine check-up in the past year

Section titled Making a Difference

Public Health is for all of us. Join the CDC and its partners as we work together to improve the health of people living with disabilities. Promotion of healthy living, monitoring public health data, researching and reducing health disparities, building inclusive health programs, and improving access to health care.]

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/announcements/" rel="category tag">Announcements</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

Moving Forward with HIV Prevention

Some exciting developments in HIV prevention were presented this past July at the IAS Conference on HIV Science. Initially, prevention of HIV transmission was only safe sex practices. Then in 2012 the drugs we know as PrEP and PEP were approved to prevent the transmission of HIV. PrEP is a prevention drug that can be taken daily the prevent transmission for people who are more likely to come into contact with HIV, like someone whose sexual partner is HIV positive. The NIAID is funding research into new ways to administer PrEP that do not require daily pills. This infographic describes the current research!

Read more about prevention efforts and advances at http://bit.ly/36ndIEs

Infographic titled Long-Acting Forms of HIV Prevention

For some people, long-acting forms of HIV prevention may be more desirable than a daily pill

Section titled HIV Prevention today- and in the future

Taking an oral dose of the medication Truvado once a day, every day can prevent HIV infection.

NIAID-funded researchers are developing and testing alternative HIV prevention products that could be inserted, injected, infused, or implanted from once a month (monthly)… to once a year (yearly) in people who commit to using the products on an ongoing basis.

New section titled NIAID is funding research on 4 types of long-acting HIV prevention

Intravaginal Ring (IVR): Polymer ring inserted into the vagina releases antiretroviral drug over time

Implant: Device implanted in the body releases antiretroviral drug over time

Injectable: Long-acting antiretroviral drug is injected into the body

Antibody: Antibody is infused or injected into the body

New Heading titled At What Stage Is This Research

Implant is in design and development and manufacturing and safety study stages

Ring and antibody are in manufacturing and safety study and human study stages, and injectable is in human study stage.

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

HIV Medications

The first treatment for HIV, Azidothymidine (AZT) or the generic name zidovudine was introduced in 1987. Though initially developed as a potential cancer therapy, it was included in a screening program to identify drugs that could treat HIV. Though AZT was an exciting medical development, there were serious side effects, so further testing and trials to guide dosage and develop new drugs were important next steps. In 1997, HAART became the new standard of treatment, which combined drugs from different categories that were tailored to the individual by their physician. Below are some of the categories of current drugs, and there are now brand-name pills that combine the medicine from several categories into a single pill instead of the up to 20 individual pills that used to be common!

What does current HIV medicine do?

  • Prevents HIV from making copies of itself (NRTI’s, NNRTI’s, PI’s,  integrase inhibitors) 
  • Block the virus from entering key immune response cells (fusion inhibitors, CCR5 Antagonists, post-attachment inhibitors)
  • Some drugs increase the effectiveness of other HIV medications

Antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection

In the 1990s- A picture of 20 pills with varying appearance and the text Up to 20 pills daily, taken at different intervals throughout the day

Today- a picture of a single pill and the text As little as 1 pill per day, delivering multiple drugs

The hashtag 35 Years of AIDS is at the bottom

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

The Fight Against AIDS

The struggle around HIV/AIDS in the United States is an important part of our history. Reflecting on our past helps to show how far we have come and how far we still have to go. Life expectancy before HIV treatment was incredibly low, just 10-12 years of life after diagnosis. Now, people are living longer after diagnosis and life expectancy can reach the early 70s. Deaths from HIV/AIDS in 2014 were down 76% from peak rates in 1995. The Gay Men’s Health Crisis was the first provider of treatment and opened its doors in 1982. Currently, treatment centers can be found across the country. Early prevention was solely safe sex practices, while current medicine, PEP and PrEP, increase protection and decrease chances of transmission. Groups like ACT UP and the San Francisco AIDS Foundation were and continue to be an important part of the continuing fight to recognize and eliminate HIV.

The Reunion Project on November 23 is an event for people who identify as long-term survivors of HIV and is a reflection of our past, current experience, and the exciting current developments and innovations. There will be community, fun raffles and activities, food, and more! Register at http://bit.ly/3354cDQ

An infographic titled The Fight Against AIDS

Two columns labeled Then and Now

Then: Before treatments became available in the 1990s, life expectancy for HIV-positive people in the U.S. was 10 to 20 years after diagnosis

Now: With improvements in treatment, life expectancy is now in the early 70s for some groups. It is lower for other groups, such as nonwhites and those with a history of drug use or a weaker immune system.

Then: In the mid-1990s, people with HIV/AIDS took a complicated regimen of up to 20 pills per day to treat the disease.

Now: Medical advances made treatments more effective so that today, most people with HIV/AIDS take just one pill per day

Then: In 1995, more than 48,000 people died at the peak of the epidemic in the U.S., making it the leading cause of death among Americans ages 24 to 44.

Now: In 2014, 6,721 people in the U.S. died from HIV/AIDS.

Then:  In 1986, AZT, the first drug used to treat HIV/AIDS, began clinical trials.

Now: By 2015, 15.8 million people worldwide were on anti-retroviral treatment- medications that slow the progression of HIV.

Then: In 1982, the Gay Men’s Health Crisis, the first provider of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment in the U.S. opened in New York City.

Now: Today, there are testing clinics and service providers across the U.S. Find one near you at gettested.cdc.gov

Then: Until recently, the only way to lower your risk  of getting sexually transmitted HIV was to practice safe sex and use condoms consistently and correctly.

Now: In 2012, the FDA approved a medication called PrEP that helps reduce the odds of HIV infection in high-risk groups. You can reduce the risk of infection up to 72 hours after possible exposure by starting a medicine called PEP. It’s still important to practice safe sex.

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/announcements/" rel="category tag">Announcements</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

Diabetes Month

It’s the first day of National Diabetes Month! If you’re living with diabetes, knowledge and management are key to preventing further problems and living a full life. Eating healthily, staying active, and monitoring your blood sugar and general health are the basics of managing diabetes. Having a team of people, including friends, family, and doctors to support your care is a very good practice, and can help with problem solving and reducing risk of other problems with eyes, feet and teeth.

The Critical Path Learning Center has several workshops related to diabetes this month. Whether you live with diabetes, are at risk, or simply curious about who is likely to be at risk, these free workshops offer knowledge and resources.  One is even about what apps you can use to help manage your diabetes!  A full list can be found at https://critpath.org/community-workshops/. You can also call 267-428-7352. 

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

Breast Cancer

1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in their lifetime, is the 2nd leading cause of death for Native American women, and in some states is the leading cause of cancer-related death. General factors that increase risk are genetics, family history, breast density, and age. When the tumor is small and most treatable is when the least symptoms are present. Annual screenings are considered optional for people aged 40-44, are advised for people aged 45-54, and for those 55+ every year or two years. Suggested ways to help prevent and catch cancer early are breastfeeding, regular mammograms, weight management, exercise, regular breast exams, and limiting alcohol use.

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

Flu Season

We’re heading into flu season, and October is a great time to get that vaccination. Though the flu is a relatively normal part of human life, it is important to remember that many people are hospitalized and die every year due to the influenza virus. The flu vaccine helps not only to reduce your chance of catching the virus, but also protects more vulnerable members of our communities. Children and infants, older adults, people who are immunocompromised, and people who are pregnant are all people we are helping to protect when we get a flu vaccine.

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

IPV

IPV, or Intimate Partner Violence affects 1 in 4 women and 1 in 9 men. Even higher rates of IPV are true for certain populations of people. The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the National Organization for Women report that LGBT people and women of color experience higher rates of intimate partner violence, yet those cases are underreported and the people involved do not receive supportive services. Over half of women living with HIV have experienced intimate partner violence.

This month, the Lutheran Settlement House is putting on a rally titled “Men Can Prevent Violence“

October 16, 2019

11:00am – 1:00pm

Thomas Paine Plaza

Learn how to get involved, hear inspiring stories of men’s work to end DV, and enjoy snacks, resources, and entertainment.

The Philadelphia Domestic Violence Hotline is 1-866-723-3014

TTY: 215-456-1529

It is 24-hour, free, confidential, and anonymous

For more information the CDC and The Office of Justice have some reports:

(https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/intimatepartnerviolence/index.html)

(https://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2018/info_flyers/fact_sheets/2018NCVRW_IPV_508_QC.pdf)

 

 

 

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

Mental Illness Awareness Month

The National Alliance on Mental Illness celebrates the first week of October as Mental Illness Awareness Month. About 1 in 4 adults experience mental illness in a year, and 1 in 17 adults lives with a serious mental illness. Some common symptoms to pay attention to for yourself or people you care about are:

  • Excessive emotions (worry, fear, sadness) including  extreme mood swings
  • Changes in sleeping, eating, or sexual habits
  • Difficulty perceiving reality, or changes in one’s own feelings, thoughts, or personality
  • Multiple physical ailments with no apparent cause (headaches, stomachaches, etc)
  • Thinking about suicide
  • Inability to complete daily tasks, or handle daily stress and emotion

For more information, and specifics on different mental health concerns, a wealth of resources is available at https://www.nami.org/. There are also mental health services at places like the Diana Baldwin Mental Health Center, PHMC Health Connection, The Family Practice and Counseling Network, and other Federally Qualified Health Centers around the city.

CALL THE NAMI HELPLINE: 800-950-NAMI

info@nami.org

FIND HELP IN A CRISIS OR TEXT “NAMI” TO 741-741

 

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

Heart Attack Symptoms Vary

The Center for Disease Control cites heart disease as the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Men have a greater risk of heart attack, and tend to experience one at an earlier age. Regardless of gender, prevention through primary care, testing, and heart-healthy activities and diets are important.  Knowing the warning signs of a heart attack can be crucial. People have various warning signs of a heart attack, and in many cases men and women notice different symptoms. Nausea and vomiting, shortness of breath, and chest, neck, or back pain are common symptoms. Others can include upper back pain, fainting, indigestion, and extreme fatigue.

Philadelphia Fight’s Men and Boys Health fair is this Saturday, come out and learn about important resources to stay healthy!

https://www.facebook.com/events/556518551554065/

 

Posted in <a href="https://fight.org/category/health-fact-friday/" rel="category tag">Health Fact Friday</a> Tagged <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-fact-friday/" rel="tag">Health Fact Friday</a>, <a href="https://fight.org/tag/health-facts-friday/" rel="tag">health facts Friday</a> Leave a comment

Spotlight On

Karam Mounzer, MD

Dr. Mounzer identified two major gaps in the care of patients with HIV/hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection, and the complexity of multidrug-resistant HIV treatment. He is involved with many clinical trials focusing on drug development and better understanding of HIV immunopathogenesis with the Wistar Institute. He is involved in teaching and mentoring.

Learn More about Spotlight On
Dr. Karam Mounzer

Dr. Mario Cruz

Dr. Mario CruzDr. Cruz is a board certified pediatrician who serves as the Medical Director for our Pediatrics and Adolescent Health Center. He has presented and/or published in the fields of community violence and domestic violence prevention, quality improvement, behavioral health, curriculum development and mentorship. In 2019 he received the Greater Philadelphia Social Innovation Award for Innovations in Healthcare.


Translate »