Beyond the Walls: Workshops by Session

Session One: 10:45am – 11:55am

105A

This workshop is designed to provide an overview of common physical and psychological concerns that are typically associated with long and short-term incarceration.

  • Minnie Moore-Johnson PhD Criminal Justice, Greater Philadelphia Health Action
  • Editus Addy Master’s Degree in Clinical Social Work, Greater Philadelphia Health Action
  • Marilyn Martinez, Greater Philadelphia Health Action

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

111B

Reentry to society is best with reentry to the workforce. Come learn techniques for resume writing, job interviewing, and general workplace skills.   This will be an interactive discussion where you are able to ask specific questions related to issues and concerns when returning to the workforce upon release from incarceration. The information is also good for anyone who might be job hunting now or in the future.

  • Susan B Thomas MBA, District 1199C Training & Upgrading Fund
  • Lisa Wallace, District 1199C Training & Upgrading Fund

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

109B

What is the role of community bail funds in prison abolition? How can we situate community bail funds within the context of historical and contemporary Black-led freedom struggles, and how are community bail funds helping to end cash bail across the country today? What role do re-entry supportive services play in the community bail fund movement? This workshop will explore these questions, and will support interested participants in joining the movement to #EndCashBail in Philadelphia!

  • Michael McKee, Philadelphia Community Bail Fund
  • Candace McKinley, Philadelphia Community Bail Fund
  • David Harrington, Philadelphia Community Bail Fund
  • Veronica Rex, Philadelphia Community Bail Fund
  • Nasir Muhammad, Philadelphia Community Bail Fund

Tracks: Activism and Community Empowerment

104AB

Participants will learn the importance of a self care plan and tools for developing positive self care strategies geared toward preventing burnout among social service professionals serving returning citizens and returning citizens themselves. This is important for the positive physical and mental health of returning citizenss and those who serve their needs. The workshop is interactive and requires involving the audience’s experiences and needs in forming strategies.

  • Rev. Dr. Chris Kimmenez Psy D, Healing Communities/RCC Urban CDC
  • Rev. Paula Burnett-Kimmenez A.A., RHD/RCC Urban CDC

Tracks: Activism and Community Empowerment

111A

Within the movement to end mass incarceration, the experiences of women, trans, and gender nonconforming folks are silenced and often forgotten. This workshop will demonstrate how art with a vision can be used to change and dismantle systems of oppression, such as mass incarceration, and move us toward prison abolition and restorative justice. Through dialogue, we will re-center and re-focus our attention on those marginalized in this movement, and leave participants with tangible steps for how they can ethically be bridge builders and truth speakers.

The discussion will:

  • center women, trans, and gender nonconforming people within the movement to end mass incarceration
  • highlight the work of artists/activists who work with marginalized communities affected by mass incarceration
  • provide participants with tangible steps and guides for connecting personal narrative to a larger vision for change using art
  • present the Leeway Foundation as a source of support (financial and otherwise) for women, trans and gender nonconforming artists seeking to dismantle the prison industrial complex

 

  • Denise Beek, Leeway Foundation
  • Nikki Powerhouse, Paulette Carrington
  • Reno Wright

Tracks: Activism and Community Empowerment

106AB

Outlawed in California, New York, and Washington D.C., since 2012 Pennsylvania prosecutors have been using Comstock Act era tactics in an effort to detain prostitutes to combat trafficking. Is charging individuals for Instruments of Crime an effective policing tactic in ending human trafficking; or is contributing to challenges in addressing important public health risks surrounding HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, and sexually transmitted diseases? Philadelphia and Pittsburgh are combining forces for important advocacy work to draw attention to these practices.

  • Melanie Dante Goddard College HAS MA, SWOP Behind Bars
  • Jessie Sage MA, University of Pittsburgh Department of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies
  • PJ Sage PhD Sociology University of Maryland, SWOP Pittsburgh
  • Gabrielle Monroe

Tracks: Legal Issues

110AB

In this workshop, public defenders will give an interactive presentation on the criminal justice system that helps community members and leaders understand the justice process and how to prepare for each stage of a case. Please join in this discussion and gain critical information to help navigate through the Philadelphia legal system.

  • Kavita Goyal, Defender Association of Philadelphia
  • Mark Houldin Attorney, Defender Association of Philadelphia

Tracks: Legal Issues

105B

While there is growing awareness of the connection between developmental trauma, neglect, attachment disruptions, and other related childhood adversity and the increase risk for school suspension, expulsion, seclusion, and restraint, there is limited acknowledgment of the impact of exposure to historical and racial trauma over multiple generations. This multi-media session will include an interactive exercise highlighting how repeated exposure to trauma during childhood impacts the growth and development of children; how the risk of such exposure to traumatic situations increases in adverse community environments (violence, discrimination, unsafe housing, lack of opportunity); and how the availability/absence of protective factors (such as parental protection, nurturing neighbors, school support) can mitigate/exacerbate the impact of such exposure. The impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and adverse community environments on an individual’s ability to function, even as an adult, will also be explored, as well as the importance of recognizing and understanding such impaired functioning when representing an individual facing criminal charges.

  • Leslie Faith Jones, Esq. J.D., Montgomery County Office of the Pubic Defender

Tracks: School to Prison Pipeline

112AB

The Black Boy Experience is a lived-experience based workshop designed to provide formerly incarcerated men with the opportunity to share their experiences through storytelling and through the active engagement of workshop participants. Experiences of the pre, during and post incarceration lives of workshop facilitators are shared in an interactive and participant-relevant (but non “scared-straight”) manner.

The workshops provide illumination for the often hidden societal and systemic gateways to mass incarceration, and to support youth to challenge systems and negative expectations via self and societal awareness and advocacy.

  • Kaliek Hayes, ChildhoodsLost Foundation
  • Connie Grier M. Ed., The RESPECT Alliance
  • Rakeem Jeter
  • Kempis Songster
  • Malik Bandy
  • Stephen Gardner
  • John Pace

Tracks: Storytelling; Youth

107A

According to Bureau of Justice Statistics, between 1977 and 2007, the number of women in prison in the US increased by 832%. This dramatic rise resulted in increased health concerns specific to incarcerated women’s physical and mental health. Nationally, 4% of women enter state prisons and 3% of women enter federal prisons, pregnant. Most women are then forced to give their babies up within 24 hours, following the trauma of labor – often taking place in unethical conditions within the prison setting. Mothers are left to deal with the mental stress and trauma of postpartum separation, and babies bear the negative effects of missed bonding time with their mothers. Currently, only 10 states have nursery programs, focused on Early Childhood Development and mother-child bonding and parenting in the critical first years. These programs have drawn criticism despite data that has demonstrated reduced recidivism rates for mothers who can stay with their babies and better outcomes for the children. This workshop will examine data from several studies including a 2009 longitudinal study from Nebraska’s Department of Corrections that make the case for expanding these programs nationally. 

  • Julie Hackett BS in Foreign Service, Georgetown University, MA in International Relations, Johns Hopkins University, Coach Your Vision
  • Gina Curry BS in Criminal Justice, MA in Criminal Justice, St. Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, PA, Coach Your Vision

Tracks: Women

 

107B

This interactive discussion will focus on the creation of a more child-centered trauma-informed approach to juvenile justice. Panelists and participants will discuss the importance of children and families staying informed and being active participants in their legal representation in the justice system. The session will address the importance of systems reform and using evidenced-based trauma-informed systems that respond well to the overall needs of children that are different than the needs of adults. Discussion will also center on providing community-based options for children in placements and shifting away from reliance on sending children far away from home.

  • Leola Hardy Attorney, Defender Association of Philadelphia
  • Isis Misdary, Defender Association of Philadelphia
  • S. W., 16 year-old Youth Participant Of Juvenile Justice System
  • Zakiyyah S., Mother of 13 year-old Youth Participant Of Juvenile Justice System

Tracks: Youth

Session Two: 12:05pm – 1:15pm

110AB

This workshop will look at how to navigate the return to society by men and women who have served time in prison or are battling the stigma of a criminal history.The workshop will explore how to find gainful employment and the importance of education and vocational training for the returning citizen. An inside look into the criminal justice system and best practices for successful reintegration will be discussed and considered in light of the barriers facing people with prior convictions. An open an honest discussion will be encouraged with all parties involved in this process having an opportunity to share the view from their perch.

  • Jeffrey Abramowitz Juris Doctorate, National Workforce Opportunity Network

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

111A

This workshop will focus on the issue of brain injury among justice-involved people. Research from across the United States indicates that approximately 60% of adults who are incarcerated have history of brain injury, and that most of those injuries were never diagnosed or treated. Two recent projects in the state of PA have focused on the problem of unidentified brain injury in corrections settings. The first project was based out of SCI Graterford and assisted men as they came home. The second was implemented in a variety of juvenile justice settings. This workshop will describe brain injury and its impact on functioning, briefly touch on relevant research, and describe the elements and results of both PA projects. Potential ways to identify and support both adults and youth who have been affected by brain injury will also be described. The workshop will emphasize the need for screening for brain injury so that individuals can get to the right resources before significant problems emerge. It will also describe the available resources for adults and youth with brain injury. Case examples will be provided. Finally, several recommendations for policy consideration will be presented

  • MJ Schmidt MA, CBIS, Brain Injury Association of PA
  • Monica Vaccaro MS, Brain Injury Association of PA

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

104AB

During the session, attendees will learn why sex work decriminalization should be a public health priority, how the criminalization of sex work and HIV compounds harms to the most vulnerable workers, and how Philadelphia-based organizations are responding to new and emerging opportunities to improve the safety and wellbeing of sex workers through policy change.

  • Lore Elisabeth, Project SAFE
  • Lori Tyndall, Project SAFE
  • Nina Marsoopia, Project SAFE

Tracks: Activism and Community Empowerment

112AB

In this participatory workshop we will reflect on violence and victimization in our communities and society. What questions do we need to ask in order to solve the problems of our criminal justice system and of the way we as communities have been addressing violence and victimization? We center this workshop experience on the principle and cultural concept of Ubuntu, which implies humanity towards others,’ or, in a more philosophical sense, ‘the belief in a universal bond of sharing that connects all humanity.

  • Kempis Ghani Songster, Etta Cetera

Tracks: Keynote Workshop

107B

As of October 2016, the Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBoP) hepatitis C (HCV) testing guidelines recommend “opt out” antibody-only testing for all sentenced inmates, all inmates with certain clinical conditions and all inmates who request testing. Those testing antibody positive should later be screened for chronic infection. All non-sentenced individuals should be referred to community testing programs upon release.

Beginning May 25, 2018 the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) recommend that “opt-out” antibody with reflex to viral testing be offered to all incarcerated individuals. The FBOP and AASLD/IDSA HCV guidelines also differ in their recommendations regarding treatment with the FBOP prioritizing treatment for individuals with advanced liver disease whereas the AASLD/IDSA recommends treatment for all individuals chronically infected with HCV regardless of the stage of liver disease.

The Philadelphia Department of Prisons (PDP) is working to address the differences between the FBOP guidelines and the AASLD/IDSA guidelines by partnering with Philadelphia FIGHT’s C a Difference Program in order to increase access to HCV testing and linkage to care services.

  • Dr. Stacey Trooskin MD, PhD, MPH, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Dr. Bruce Herdman PhD, Philadelphia Department of Prisons
  • Ms. Ebonee Allen, Philadelphia FIGHT

Tracks: Prison Health: From Corrections to the Community

105B

This presentation will explore the reasons why the areas of race, inequities and residential location (zip codes) have a direct correlation to the statistical data on school discipline practices in the public school systems across the country. Identification of the root causes (ACES, Trauma and Classroom Bias) of the disparities of children of color, their socioeconomics and where they reside as major contributing factors in the frequencies of harsher punishments; suspensions and expulsions in pre-school and school age children. Dialogue on how the criminalized practices of discipline in the classroom starts even earlier than expected and has become a considerable overall indicator of the precepts that exists which ultimately labels children and actively prepares their journey toward involvement in the juvenile justice system and beyond. Lastly, considering the dangers children face when entering formalized educational environments and the adjustments of the discipline practices that socialize children to believe their place is in the pipeline to prison.

  • Gina Curry Masters of Science in Criminal Justice and Sociolgy; BS in Criminal Justice, CYV
  • Julie Hackett MS in International Relations, CYV
  • Courtney Turner

Tracks: Activism and Community Empowerment

105A

  • This presentation will provide an overview of the Spiritual Resilience Council Training program, display the preliminary results of said training, and grant opportunities to further explore fostering psychological and spiritual resilience among formerly incarcerated persons (FIPs).
  • Rev. Dr. Lori Banfield Master of Theological Studies (MTS) in Christian Counseling & Doctor of Arts (DA) in Marriage and Family Therapy, Redemption Housing – Reentry Services

Tracks: Spiritually Based Prison Work

106AB

The workshop is designed to have a candid conversation with formerly incarcerated persons and family members who have been affected by life long sentences of their love ones while struggling to keep their faith and encourage their love ones who are incarcerated. We will also discuss the affect of Mass Incarceration on the African-American family structure and our community. In addition, we will look at how Mass Incarceration has impacted our educational system. What impact should and can the religious community have upon the practice of incarceration of minority males.

  • Audrey Moody, Retired Psychiatric Social Worker
  • Bobbi Person, Retired School Psychiatrist
  • Archie Leacock, Institute for the Development of African-American Youth
  • Ronald Brown, Member of PANN
  • Brandon Robinson
  • Emmanuel Pernell
  • Greg Thompson

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

107A

This workshop includes stories from various genders, ages, races and identities who have been in the prison system and who are also dealing with a mental illness(es). Their experience, strength and encouragement will be shared. How they lived, how they coped, and how they are recovering is key. There will also be education around the subject of mental illness, how it affects the individual, as well as their family members. Resources will be shared/offered. Also if time permits at the end there will be a Q&A session.

  • Amy Federer, NAMI National Alliance on Mental Illness
  • Maggie Frindt
  • Rhonda Hatchett
  • Rita Cain
  • David Ramirez
  • Robert Bullock

Tracks: Storytelling

109B

This presentation will bring together key stakeholders who are working tirelessly to empower, encourage, and educate women in their reentry journey to overcome barriers to accessing quality health care. The panelist will discuss unique challenges for women, hear current strategies for linkages to welfare benefits, updates to new proposed policy changes to benefits, and ways women empower each other to succeed. Discussion from Forensic Services, Why Not Prosper & the Pennsylvania Healthcare Alliance Network ( PHAN) will be part of the experience. Then hear from a women with lived experience who will share her healthcare story.

  • Katherine Addison MSW, LSW, Forensic Services- Public Health Management Corporation
  • Rev. Michelle Simmons Doctorate, Why Not Prosper
  • Faith Bartley, Why Not Prosper
  • Joanna Rosenhein

Tracks: Women

111B

A reentry education workshop exploring girls’ pathways into the juvenile justice system conducted with innovative, hands-on approaches. In this presentation we will touch on: girls getting locked into the system and transitioning from girls to women in the system. The goal of the workshop is to examine the prevalence of young girls in the forensic population and how to best work with them. We will explore gender and sexuality as part of girls’ pathways into the juvenile justice system as well as examine why we are seeing an uptick in the kind of sentences they are receiving. We will look at 3 primary ways girls experience domestic violence and enter into the juvenile and criminal justice systems. Participants will learn the consequences of the juvenile justice system’s punitive tactics on girls as well as gain an understanding of the detriment of ignoring the trauma that drives girls’ behavior and how it can exacerbate those behaviors. Lastly, during the presentation participants will have a chance to share ways we can begin to work with and treat girls who are in the system.

  • Petrena Young MS, I’m FREE – Females Reentering Empowering Each Other
  • Jacqueline Johnson MS,I’m FREE – Females Reentering Empowering Each Other

Tracks: Youth

 

 

Session Three: 2:30pm – 3:40pm

107A

This workshop is designed to assist and motivate returning citizens to explore their reentry options from a Peer lead, and Peer experienced perspective. The purpose is to discover their path to reentry success through dialogue and resource information exchange.

  • Jeffrey Bond
  • Hiram Adams
  • Omar Bey
  • Shawn Baker
  • Teresa Saunders

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

105B

Family Group Decision Making and Circles are restorative practices that are being used throughout Philadelphia to help children and families safely address reunification concerns and strategies in preparation for reunification following incarceration. The best thing is that these strategies are strength-based, neighbor-centered, and family directed and driven. The process is formally accepted by courts, government, and social service agencies as an alternative method to arrive at a reunification plan. Participants are determined by the family and can include neighbors, religious supporters, agency personnel, advocates, and children. The workshop will include a “moc” family conference and practical information about how a community, family, or community-based organization can become a skilled practitioner of this strength-based, family-centered, natural “village process” recognized as effective by government agencies, including courts.

  • Donna Jones D. Min, Emerging Ministries Corporation
  • Rev Shirley Toler MSW, Emerging Ministries Corporation
  • Tyrone Morris M.S.W., Committed Community Mentors

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

 

105A

#YouthMindsMatter is a program geared towards assisting our youth in gaining a mental grasp onto the societal woes of the past and present that they may not be privy to. It’s a tailored educational experience for impoverished children.

  • Khia Naylor, #YouthMindsMatter
  • Derrick Davis, SCI Dallas

Tracks: Activism and Community Empowerment

109B

The process of Participatory Defense has made an enormous impact on individuals facing criminal charges, and it has led to more acquittals, dismissals, bail reductions, and reduced sentences around the country. This year, the Participatory Defense model became a reality in Philadelphia through the efforts of Mothers In Charge, Life Ministry, Reclaim Philadelphia, and a number of other community organizations in partnership with the Defender Association of Philadelphia. Join us and hear from community leaders and individuals who have used this practice and had successful outcomes in their cases, and learn how anyone can participate in this important process.

  • Kavita Goyal, Defender Association of Philadelphia
  • Kris Eden, Circle of Hope Church
  • Akeem Sims, Reclaim Philadelphia
  • Pastor Linda Mason, LIFE Ministry
  • Valerie Todd, Mothers in Charge

Tracks: Activism and Community Empowerment

112AB

Death by Incarceration (DBI),more commonly known as life without parole, is we believe, the ultimate anti-human prison sentence, perhaps even more so that execution. The more traditional death penalty, capital punishment, is exactly what it claims to be – an act of pure revenge. It is not so much a commentary on the condemned person’s worth as it is on the severity of the crime. The other death penalty, by contrast – the slower, “less troublesome: type – is a statement of condemnation against even the mere possibility that a person can, someday in the future, somehow manage to fight against all the odds and transcend their worst moment. It is a sentence that says that in no amount of time and with no degree of effort can a person achieve transformation that would warrant even consideration of another chance at a life outside a prison wall. It offers no hope – no chance for redemption. Despite waning popularity in the US for state-sanctioned killing, DBI sentences continue to rise.

  • Kempis “Ghani” Songster
  • Stephanie Keene

Tracks: Keynote Workshop

 

111B

Please join Regional Directors David Burns and Christy DeFeo for an insider’s look on what employers look for when hiring individuals with a criminal justice background. David Burns will explore the history and current numbers relating to incarceration rates, education, re-entry programs, etc. while Christy DeFeo will highlight helpful tips on what employers want to see and hear at job interviews. Jay Murray, Forensic Certified Peer Specialist, will be speaking about his lived experience in the criminal justice system, the barriers he faced after reintegration and the steps he took to find employment. You don’t want to miss this inspiring and hopeful message that employment after incarceration isn’t far outside of your reach with the right attitude and resources.

  • Christy DeFeo BS, CPSS, MHP, Peerstar
  • David Burns MS, CPSS, MHP, Peerstar
  • Jay Murray CPS, FPS, Peerstar

Tracks: Storytelling

107B

It’s not enough to hear about a juveniles coping with the reality of death by incarceration. We expose workshop attendees with an opportunity to hear about the experience of children who were sentenced to life without parole and their remarkable rebirth into society after decades of confinement as well as the challenges with accessing resources to live as independent adults.

  • Donnell Drink
  • Vincent Boyd
  • Abdul Lateef
  • John Pace
  • Shavonne Robins
  • Asia Hightower, Philadelphia Defender Association/JLWOP Unit

Tracks: Story Telling

 

111A

Through the use of Spoken Word/Poetry and storytelling you will see the Back Story of my life. How being an Overcomer is possible and how I turned my brokenness into being able to help men who have committed sex offenses.

  • David Garlock BA Urban Studies focusing on Criminal Justice and Social Welfare, New Person Ministries

Tracks: Storytelling

Session Four: 3:50pm – 5:00pm

111B

People returning from incarceration need stable housing to successfully reenter our neighborhoods and communities. Many studies have shown that reentry initiatives that include housing assistance reduce recidivism rates. More than just a roof over one’s head, housing is a stabilizing force, giving people a consistent base from which they can access employment, services for mental health or substance use disorders, and other support services. It also helps people make or restore connections with community resources, with family, and with positive social networks. Unfortunately, many people leaving jails or prisons have significant challenges finding safe and affordable housing. As a result, many wind up homeless. National data shows that nearly 50,000 people a year enter shelters directly after release from correctional facilities. Many of these individuals are caught in a revolving door between homelessness and incarceration, bouncing week after week between the streets, shelter, and jails. While there are a range of programs available for people at risk of or experiencing homelessness, there are not enough resources to go around. Reentry programs have a role to play in expanding housing options to support successful reentry.

  • Anthony Powell, The Institute for Community Justice

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

111AB

Course Description:

The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with an introduction to addressing the needs of currently and formally incarcerated women veterans. A broad range of common challenges faced by women veterans are reviewed and guidelines are provided on providing gender responsive, trauma-informed services. This workshop takes a systemic approach to addressing the needs of this population, considering it as a dynamic, adaptive process that influences and is influenced by the multiple critical relationships that women veterans have with the wider environment in which she operates. Particular attention is paid to understanding the benefits of problem-focused and strength-based strategies for change. A four step model is proposed for implementing and ensuring gender responsive, trauma-informed execution. 

  • Paula Smith-Benson BSN, MSN, Women Veteran Command Center
  • Aronda Smith-Benson B.S., Women Veteran Command Center

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

106AB

The workshop provides tools, resources, and materials to those returning from being incarcerated as well as early intervention for youth ages 14-21 as to how to “position” themselves in a positive manner to secure employment, avoid incarceration, and to make a successful reentry into the community. In addition to the above, the workshop has a component dealing with Cognitive Behavior Therapy. It discussed various techniques about changing one’s thinking from negative to positive. This is to assist them to secure a job, maintain the job, and develop/maintain social relationships. The workshop will provide an interactive question and answer session with the panel to learn about various programs to overcome obstacles/barriers to successful reentry. Learn how the programs work and how to utilize them in positive manner. The panelist will be composed of individuals with trainings and most importantly lived experiences to relate to the ex-offenders and insure they will receive the hope, tools, and resources to become productive members of the community. The attendees will also learn how to replicate this program in other venues to assist and to help others in the other communities.

  • Jack Land BA and JD, PRO-ACT
  • Hank Owens BSW, PRO-ACT
  • James Kowalski, PRO-ACT

Tracks: Accessing Services for Reentry

 

112AB

Death by Incarceration (DBI),more commonly known as life without parole, is we believe, the ultimate anti-human prison sentence, perhaps even more so that execution. The more traditional death penalty, capital punishment, is exactly what it claims to be – an act of pure revenge. It is not so much a commentary on the condemned person’s worth as it is on the severity of the crime. The other death penalty, by contrast – the slower, “less troublesome: type – is a statement of condemnation against even the mere possibility that a person can, someday in the future, somehow manage to fight against all the odds and transcend their worst moment. It is a sentence that says that in no amount of time and with no degree of effort can a person achieve transformation that would warrant even consideration of another chance at a life outside a prison wall. It offers no hope – no chance for redemption. Despite waning popularity in the US for state-sanctioned killing, DBI sentences continue to rise.

  • Kempis “Ghani” Songster
  • Stephanie Keene

Tracks: Keynote Workshop

 

107A

This workshop will provide an overview of the disproportionate impact of incarceration and policing of trans and gender variant (T/GV) communities in Pennsylvania. We will discuss the challenges that T/GV people face in Pennsylvania Prisons and institutional barriers to self-determination.   In addition, we will demonstrate how collaborative work between Hearts on a Wire’s inside and outside collectives helps create community for T/GV impacted by incarceration. We will discuss the analytical and ethical common ground that holds us together as a group and situates us within the intersecting movements for trans justice and the movement to end mass incarceration. During our workshop, we will highlight our tactics and strategies by discussing several key projects and how they address systemic barriers to safety, health, and well being for T/GV individuals who are incarcerated or interface with the criminal legal system.

  • Kat Delancey, Hearts On A Wire
  • Tyra Johnson, Hearts On A Wire

Tracks: LGBTQ Issues

109B

In 2016, Action Wellness began providing services to 18-26 year olds through the RE-LINK program. The RE-LINK program provides services to young people who are currently incarcerated or who were recently released from incarceration. The program lasts for one year upon discharge and the individual does not need to be living with a chronic illness to qualify. This workshop will explore engagement and retention practices of the RE-LINK program and will give an overview of the housing landscape in Philadelphia. In addition, this workshop will provide an assessment tool to utilize during intake to determine the level care needed to effectively work with clients.

  • Odessa Summers B.S., Action Wellness
  • Malik Marrow, Action Wellness

Tracks: Youth

 

Spotlight On

Karam Mounzer, MD

Dr. Mounzer identified two major gaps in the care of patients with HIV/hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection, and the complexity of multidrug-resistant HIV treatment. He is involved with many clinical trials focusing on drug development and better understanding of HIV immunopathogenesis with the Wistar Institute. He is involved in teaching and mentoring fellows, residents and students.

Learn More about Spotlight On
Dr. Karam Mounzer

Dr. Mario Cruz

Dr. Cruz is a board certified pediatrician who joins Philadelphia FIGHT as the Medical Director for our Pediatrics and Adolescent Health Center. He completed his undergraduate training in Biology and Psychology from Union College, his medical school training at Albany Medical College, his residency training at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, and his Chief Residency at the Albert Einstein Medical Center


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