Prevention & Education Summit 2019

Tuesday, June 11th 2019

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

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HIV Prevention and Education Summit is a conference that welcomes all people interested in learning more about the wide-range of issues that impact people living with HIV (PLWH/A) and the AIDS epidemic at large. The conference provides information on the latest treatment, research, prevention, and outreach strategies and aims to bring forward explicitly the social determinants of health that place people at risk. These determinants include stigma, institutional racism, transphobia, homophobia, healthcare access, economic injustice, housing insecurity, and food insecurity to name a few. The Prevention and Education Summit shares evidence-based strategies, and best practices to prevent HIV, link individuals to care, and provide culturally competent services to all individuals. The conference explains vital health information in non-academic language, and aims to amplify the voices of PLWHA and ensures that people with lived experiences are able to stand as experts in workshops and discussions.

Speakers

Naina Khanna
Executive Director of the Positive Women’s Network

A national speaker, trainer, and advocate, Naina Khanna has worked in the HIV field since 2005, following her HIV diagnosis in 2002. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for AIDS United, the National Steering Committee for the US People Living with HIV Caucus, as a member of the Women’s HIV Research Initiative, and served on President Obama’s Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA) from 2010 – 2014.

Prior to working in HIV, Naina co-founded and served as National Field Director for the League of Pissed Off Voters, a progressive national organization working to expand participation of young people and communities of color in electoral politics. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Medical Sociology at the University of California – San Francisco.

Schedule of the day

Workshop Schedule Workshop List (PDF)

 

This training will focus on introducing participants to the dynamics of teen dating violence, how to be an amazing adult ally, and an introduction to effective intervention strategies. Participants will learn about empowerment counseling, stages of change, safety planning, and resources for teens through interactive activities.

Speakers:

Toby Fraser
Lutheran settlement house

Gabby Jackson
Lutheran settlement house

There are an estimated 30,000 people living with HIV in the Greater Philadelphia Region. We have seen a small decline in newly HIV infected individuals since the release of Truvada for PrEP but not nearly the amount you would think especially with accessibility to PrEP is so easy. Earlier this year the USPSTF released new guidelines recommend PrEP for heterosexual women who are sexually active and have a) sero-discordant sex partner, b) inconsistent use of condoms, c) a recent diagnosis of syphilis or gonorrhea, and/or d) inject drugs and share injection equipment. Despite this recommendation, PrEP uptake in women, youth and heterosexual communities are still limited. This panel discussion aims to highlight the importance of PrEP from a youth point of view. Along with a PrEP Coordinator to represent to share the clinical perspective and how PrEP has impacted sexual health.

Speakers:

Harlan Shaw
Philadelphia FIGHT

Linden Lalley-Chareczko
Philadelphina FIGHT

There are an estimated 30,000 people living with HIV in the Greater Philadelphia Region. We have seen a small decline in newly HIV infected individuals since the release of Truvada for PrEP but not nearly the amount you would think especially with accessibility to PrEP is so easy. Earlier this year the USPSTF released new guidelines recommend PrEP for heterosexual women who are sexually active and have a) sero-discordant sex partner, b) inconsistent use of condoms, c) a recent diagnosis of syphilis or gonorrhea, and/or d) inject drugs and share injection equipment. Despite this recommendation, PrEP uptake in women, youth and heterosexual communities are still limited. This panel discussion aims to highlight the importance of PrEP from a youth point of view. Along with a PrEP Coordinator to represent to share the clinical perspective and how PrEP has impacted sexual health.

Speakers:

Harlan Shaw

Philadelphia FIGHT

Linden Lalley-Chareczko

Philadelphina FIGHT

Historically when researchers have set out to study marginalized populations such as those involved with sex work, opioid usage, Hepatitis C, or people living with HIV/AIDS, they often have left communities feeling exploited and vulnerable. This pattern of unethically utilizing vulnerable populations for the purpose of academic achievement which only behooves the researchers has left these communities justifiably skeptical of future academic collaboration, even with those who strive to build lasting, mutually beneficial partnerships. Thus, it is imperative that research involving vulnerable populations be conducted in sensitive ways, that both give usable data and justice to the population at hand. In recent years, attention has been called to this issue, as academics and community members have become aware of this exploitation. Research practice must be shifted from traditional exploitation of vulnerable populations to socially just research. Many researchers feel that while they may strive to perform socially just research, they may not have the skills, background, and knowledge to do so. This will be a panel of researchers disseminating professional experience on how to work with vulnerable populations in conducting research. This panel will provide an honest discussion between academics and clinicians who have spent their careers working to build relationships with vulnerable populations for the benefit of both communities. The panel will be moderated by Master of Public Health students at Thomas Jefferson University, who have collaborated with FIGHT.

Speakers

Megan Reed

Penelope Saunders

Lori Tyndall

Alexis M. Roth

are all living with H.I.V., they have all dealt with the twin burdens of living with H.I.V., loneliness and isolation, and they have all dealt with those burdens and have overcome them. Each of our panel members will discuss

the strategies he or she employed to confront their loneliness and isolation, some by working in meaningful and fulfilling jobs, others by volunteering to help others with H.I.V. or in their communities, still others by finding the courage to disclose their status to their families and loved ones, who in turn provided the comfort and support that breached the wall of loneliness and isolation that living with H.I.V. had built.

Speakers:

Robert Kosseff M.A

Comhar

Pablo Salinas M.Ed

Comhar

Michael Palumbaro R.N

Comhar

Sandra Collett

Comhar

Gwendolyn Mills-Smith

Comhar

Carla Fields

Comhar

Michael Patterson

Comhar

Debra Stafford

Comhar

Hepatitis C treatment can now CURE hepatitis C in the majority of people and eliminate hepatitis C on the global scale. Increased efforts to cure individuals living with HCV within the co-infected population are underway at FIGHT and all other clinics caring for PLWHIV We invite you to hear about how Philadelphia is leading the US in the goal to eliminate HCV among PLWHIV.

Speakers:

Stacey Trooskin
Philadelphia FIGHT

Alex Shirreffs MPH
AACO- C Ya

With rates of overdose deaths climbing to epidemic levels in Philadelphia and across the US, service providers and those living in community with people living with addictions must be equipped to intervene in the event of an overdose, and to prevent overdoses before they happen. This workshop describes how to meet clients living with addiction “where they’re at” through harm reduction practice methodologies, how to identify symptoms of an overdose, and how to use Naloxone (Narcan) to revive a person who is overdosing. The second half of this workshop will be dedicated to learning how to use Naloxone, and the first 50 people in attendance will be given a Naloxone kit to carry with them.

Speakers:

Elvis Rosado AAS

Retention in care improves survival and reduces the risk of HIV transmission to others. However, only 55% of PLWH in Philadelphia were retained in care in 2016. The Cooperative Re-engagement Controlled Trial (CoRECT) is funded by CDC through a cooperative agreement with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health (PDPH) to evaluate a combined health department and HIV medical facility intervention to improve engagement in HIV care.

During this session, we will provide:

An overview of the CoRECT project from PDPH staff and medical facilities;

Provide a summary of barriers to retention in care reported by PLWH who disengaged from medical care in Philadelphia: and

Discuss how CoRECT can achieve the goal of improving access to HIV care for vulnerable populations, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality, HIV health disparities, and HIV transmission.

Speakers:

Kathleen Brady MD
AIDS Activities Coordinating Office/Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Daiquiri Robinson
Penn CFAR CAB

Crystal Lucas MSW
AIDS Activities Coordinating Office/Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Anthony Gerard
Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Nashira Alston
Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Sara Allen CRNP
Drexel University/Partnership Clinci

Learn about the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) project and the first transgender women cycle with a community-driven approach. In this workshop you will learn about the: (1) goal of the NHBS project; (2) the formative assessment methods, process, and key results; and (3) the development of a Community Advisory Board (CAB). Specifically, we will highlight the collaborative effort between the AIDS Activities Coordinating Center at the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, researchers at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, and transgender women to develop a CAB to inform the implementation of the surveillance project and identify key health priorities for transgender women in Philadelphia. This workshop includes 5 women from the Community Advisory Board (Kendall Stephens, Community Activist; Hazel Edwards, Community Advocate and Educator; Naiymah Sanchez, Transgender Education and Advocacy Coordinator; Robyn Ryan, Transgender Advocate; and Andrea Castro-Convers, Psychologist).

Speakers:

Nadia Dowshen MD, MSHP
Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia

Siobhan Gruschow MPH, MEd
Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia

Joshua Franklin BA
University of Pennsylvania

Andrea Harrington
Philadelphia Department of Public Health, AIDS Activities Coordinating Office

Jennifer Shinefeld MS
Philadelphia Department of Public Health, AIDS Activities Coordinating Office

Kathleen Brady MD
Philadelphia Department of Public Health, AIDS Activities Coordinating Office

Adriana Castro-Convers PhD
Pennsylvania Hospital

Cupcakes and Crucial Conversations is a highly interactive workshop for youth , parents, community members and professionals . Participants will enjoy a relaxed environment while in engaging in open and honest conversations about crucial issues facing our youth today.

The workshop will address HOT topics such as Consent, Social media safety, Dangers hidden in apps, Bodily Autonomy, Choices and Risks involved in sexting.

Participants will engage in activities to help them understand the essential qualities of understanding who they are as individuals and how silence, shaming and stigmatized messaging may have impacted their beliefs.

This will be coupled with conversations and discussions of acceptance, self love, self esteem of oneself and others to eradicate and dismantle shameful or unhealthy perceptions and perspective.

Speakers:

Lynette Medley M.Ed Human Sexuality Education
No More Secrets Mind Body Spirit Inc.

Nya McGlone M.S Animal and Poultry Sciences
No More Secrets Mind Body Spirit Inc.

Approximately 900,000 new HIV infections among women occur globally each year, 50,000 of which occur in the United States. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of PrEP in women when PrEP in when taken daily, and updated USPSTF guidelines recommend PrEP for heterosexual women who are sexually active and have a) sero-discordant sex partner, b) inconsistent use of condoms, c) a recent diagnosis of syphilis or gonorrhea, and/or d) inject drugs and share injection equipment. Despite this recommendation, PrEP uptake in women is still limited. This panel discussion aims to highlight the importance of PrEP when discussing sexual health with women/persons assigned female sex at birth and features the experiences of two patient advocates who will discuss their decision to initiate PrEP and the barriers they have faced.

Speakers:

William Short MD, MPH, AAHIVS
University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine

Linden Lalley-Chareczko Masters of Arts
Phildelphia FIGHT

Jason Culler
Philadelphia FIGHT

Dora W
University of Pennsylvania

Patient Participant
Univsersity of Pennsylvania

Patient Participant
Philadelphia FIGHT

The opioid epidemic is driving new cases of HIV and HCV. Hepatitis C is no longer a problem that is focused in the baby boomer population. There was a recent outbreak of HIV among PWID in Philadelphia along with a growing number of new cases of HCV among a younger cohort that mirrors the opioid epidemic

Speakers:

Stacey Trooskin MD, PhD
Philadelphia FIGHT

Eman Addish MPH
Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Time after time, us women have made the mistake of trying to “find” a man to make us happy. Because God did not intend for us to be the finders, it rarely works out. We tend to seek out things in other people that we can’t find within ourselves. But how can you love yourself or expect someone else to love you without first knowing and loving who you are? How do you live with a positive diagnosis if you were already “not good enough” before that diagnosis? How do you protect your heart while also protecting the health of others? And through all of that, how do you continue to trust God even when you feel like He let you down? We must learn to be patient and prepare ourselves for the man that God created specifically for us.

Speakers:

Lynette Trawick
I Am U, Inc

Ciarra Covin

People living with HIV have often experienced tremendous discrimination, trauma, stigma, and loss. Many have experienced times of seeing themselves as victims, or have been treated as victims by others. Viewing people living with HIV as victims has been reinforced through the media, healthcare system, and daily interactions. Yet, there exists the great possibility for people living with HIV to move on from a mindset of victimhood and toward a state of thriving.

This workshop is designed for individuals living with HIV who are interested in unpacking grief and victimhood and moving to a place of resilience and thriving. We will look at positive frameworks that can assist us to reach a point where we look ahead with hope for the future, while also embracing the past. Participants will be encouraged to reflect on what “thriving” means to them and how they have progressed – or are currently progressing – from seeing themselves as victims to becoming individuals who thrive with HIV. Every person’s journey is unique and participants will have the opportunity to share their own knowledge and tips.

Speakers:

Michael Byrne MSW
LGBT Elder Initiative

Teresa Sullivan
Positive Women’s Network, Philadelphia FIGHT

David Gana
LGBT Elder Initiative

Ensuring girls are aware of the contraceptive options is empowering. Research tells us that teaching girls about

contraceptive education “builds their confidence, self-reliance and ability to make strategic life choices.” When we provide teens, particularly girls, with the information they need to manage their fertility we are also empowering them to make decisions about their overall sexual health. Given the prevalence of teen birth among Black and Latinx girls in the city of Philadelphia Contraceptive Education by knowledgeable adults is multi-purposed; it makes girls aware of their contraceptive options and provides information that is vital to preventing the transmission of STIs.

Speakers:

Tawanna Jones Morrison Doctor of Education
We.REIGN., Inc.

Our transformation workers have backgrounds in the areas of diversity, empowerment, reconciliation, and healing through counseling, doula work, community work, listening sessions, and communal interfaith initiatives.

The training is a communal exploration of the personal, interpersonal, and structural aspects of human difference, encouraging individuals to understand themselves in a deeper way as it relates to our collective history, our fears, and our biases. As a result, our interaction with others, regardless of human difference, begins to be guided by a deeper consciousness of our world and who we are within the world.

Speakers:

Dr. Dominique Vedrine Ph. D.
Speaking Down Barriers

Scott Neely M.Div
Speaking Down Barriers

Crystal Irby BA
Speaking Down Barriers

Marlanda Dekine MSW
Speaking Down Barriers

While there have been phenomenal medical advances with HIV and AIDS, people still die as a result and their families are left to grieve. Many times, the loss is not acknowledged; this is called disenfranchised grief. Disenfranchised grief is experienced when the death of a loved one is not acknowledged, socially supported or accepted. This highly interactive workshop will address disenfranchised grief associated with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/A); providing a safe place to share stories so that we can move from isolation to connection and from judgment to compassion. At the conclusion, the workshop will be facilitated by a board certified music therapist utilizing rituals of remembrance for those that we have loved and will always love.

Speakers:

Rita Milburn-Dobson RNC, MA, M.Div., D. Min
Precious Gems Supportive Services

Aphten Milburn-Dobson BM
Precious Gems Supportive Services

Nine out of ten U.S. teens use social media daily (Office of Adolescent Health, 2016). Young people everywhere have potential access to an abundance of information about sexual health, substance misuse, and violence prevention. In this panel discussion, we will explore ways to engage with high-risk young people using social and digital media as tools for HIV/STD prevention. We will explore effective approaches to leverage social and digital media as health education platforms, specifically focusing on HIV/STD prevention at the local, national, and global levels. Our panelists will address healthcare disparities among youth including those living with HIV/AIDS. Specifically, we will discuss issues related to access to care, emotional support, and preventive care and effective social media interventions that address these topics from a local, national, and global perspective. Dr. Bauermeister conducts interdisciplinary HIV prevention research that targets young sexual, gender and racial minority populations in Philadelphia affected by disparities. Dr. Chiang champions physicians using their platform on social media to empower patients to find accurate medical information online. Finally, Dr. Henderson-Riley uses her expertise in health communications to connect with an international and immigrant audience.

Speakers:

Sabina Spigner BA, MS, MPH (c)
Thomas Jefferson University College of Population Health

Nataki Duncan BS, MPH (c)
Thomas Jefferson University College of Population Health

Austin Chiang MD, MPH, BS
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital/Jefferson Health

Amy Henderson Riley DrPH, MCHES
Thomas Jefferson University College of Population Health

Jose Bauermeister PhD, MPH, BA
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing; Perelman School of Medicine

There is tons of evidenced based research on the importance of establishing effective self care practices. They prevent burnout, mental fatigue, are effective protective factors for mental illness, and contribute to positive physical health outcomes. These practices are equally effective for PLWHA and those serving them in helping positions. So why is it so many people in helping positions neglect self care or have unhealthy coping strategies? We will explore this as well as explore interactive activities to help the audience identify self care that they can put into practice.

Speakers:

Rev. Dr. Chris Kimmenez Psy D, D Min
Healing Communities USA

Rev. Paula Kimmenez

Through the power of storytelling and up-to-date information participants will learn the basics of HIV and AIDS. If you have questions about what HIV is or how it’s transmitted this workshop will work to create a safe space to learn the basics. During this presentation participants will learn about the differences between HIV and AIDS; how HIV is transmitted and prevented; and about HIV testing and treatment. After attending this workshop, participants will be ready to join other workshops with confidence in their knowledge of HIV/AIDS, as well as understand the risks of acquiring or transmitting HIV.

Speakers:

Emily Gus
Philadelphia FIGHT

Philadelphia is a major HIV cure research hub and home to several ongoing HIV cure research trials. This annual HIV Cure research update is developed with the community in mind, and the purpose is to share what is new and exciting. This workshop may also offer a unique and important voice – someone who has participated in an HIV cure trial.

Speakers:

Luis J Montaner DVM, MSc, DPhil
The Wistar Institute

Pablo Tebas MD
University of Pennsylvania

Kenneth Lynn MBA, RN
Penn-Preabyterian Medical Center

This workshop aims to address the challenges individuals living with HIV/AIDS and housing insecurity face in obtaining prescription medications and maintaining treatment necessary to manage their health. Panelists will include healthcare practitioners, social workers, and others who work closely with people experiencing homelessness. The challenges will be addressed through a series of facilitated questions pertaining to prescription access, housing resources, and care management. Resources to overcome these challenges will be provided. A question and answer session will be available at the end, allowing participants to obtain additional information.

Speakers:

Rachel Ewalt BA, MPH
Thomas Jefferson University College of Population Health

Kimberly Chiaramonte MSS, LSW
Community Health Centers Clinic at Broad Street Ministry

Action Wellness is currently partnering in a research study with the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health to assess the impact of Client-Centered Representative Payee (CCRP) services among marginalized and unstably housed PLWH. This presentation will provide an overview of the study and describe ways in which we operationalize harm reduction and client-centered approaches to care, as well as housing and health improvements that may be experienced by those who participate in CCRP services.

Speakers:

Zack Hagert MPH
Action Wellness

Stephanie Creasy MPH
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health

Lynette Trawick and her son, Khalel (16) will present a discussion based workshop about how to disclose your HIV status to your child and provide information for feedback from the child’s perspective.

Speakers:

Lynette Trawick
I AM U, Inc

By 2020 approximately 70% of all PLHIV will be 50 years of age and older! Social Isolation seems to be a “natural occurrence” associated with the aging process. Studies have shown PLHIV 50 yrs and older are at an increased risk of mental health concerns, including, depression, social isolation and suicide. This presentation is meant to raise consciousness around this aging and HIV conundrum while fostering dialogue around how PLHIV and the people who serve them can meet these challenges.

Speakers:

Robert Pompa MSW
LVHN CHS

Via a panel discussion with individuals with lived experience of HIV, Sexual Assault, Substance Abuse, Breast Cancer, and other health-related issues, this workshop will empower women to reclaim the functionality of their lives while addressing issues of co-morbidity and learn how the panelist overcame their adversities and used such experiences to support other women.

Speakers:

Tashina Okorie, PHD
Philadelphia FIGHT

Jennifer Jones, PHD
Philadelphia FIGHT

Kahooting with Youth is a game-based workshop designed using the Kahoot app to increase participants’ awareness of HIV/AIDS and sexual health.

Speakers:

Abigale Harry Masters in Health Administration
Philadelphia FIGHT

We all have the right to have amazing sex, regardless of HIV status, and we must all do our part to make sex both amazing and safe. Talking about sex with our sexual partners (primary or casual) can be a difficult process, but knowing how to have these conversations with our partners is key in promoting HIV prevention. This workshop aims to help Latino LGBTQ+ and their same-sex sexual partners (primary o casual) to have these conversations regarding sexual health, overall wellness, as well as setting and accomplishing goals.

Speakers:

Omar Valentin MPH
Temple University

Lorett Matus
Congreso de Latinos Unidos

This session will discuss how PrEP is perceived or could be used for HIV prevention in two unique groups of Philadelphia women. The session will cover lessons we have learned talking to both women who inject drugs and transgender women about PrEP and the barriers they have to using and adhering to it. These cutting-edge studies will bring a new perspective on how best to introduce PrEP as a public health prevention strategy in women at risk for HIV infection.

Speakers:

Sarah Bass Ph.D., MPH
Risk Communication Lab, Temple University College of Public Health

Jesse Brajuha MPH
Risk Communication Lab, Temple University College of Public Health

Paul D’Avanzo MS
Risk Communication Lab, Temple University College of Public Health

The Drexel Partnership Outreach Team facilitates engagement in care for new patients and for those who have missed their appointments. The Outreach Specialist reaches out to new patients prior to their upcoming appointment and also meets with them at their initial visit. The Outreach Specialist reaches out to patients who did not make it to their follow up appointments within 24-48 hours to address barriers to follow up and to reschedule the missed appointment. The Outreach Team has built up and has been facilitating our CAB. In addition, the Outreach Team has been working with our community partners to increase HIV testing and to educate the community about HIV and HIV Prevetion/PrEP.

Speakers:

Zsofia Szep MD
Partnership

Brian Aarons
Partnership

Rhonda Ferguson
Drexel Partnership

Jen Mainville
Drexel Partnership

In this workshop, we will share the results of our community-based study called Parents ASSIST (Advancing Supportive and Sexuality-Inclusive Sex Talks), which is an online animated video series that teaches parents how to talk about sexuality and health with their gay, bisexual, and queer (GBQ) adolescent sons. GBQ adolescent males report a sense of obligation to their parents to stay healthy, but they often do not talk about sexual health with their parents. Research with heterosexual adolescents has shown that effective parent-child sex communication enhances youth’s self-efficacy with using condoms, resisting pressure to have sex, initiating conversations about HIV/STIs prior to having sex, and accessing reproductive and sexual health services. Yet, little work has been done to incorporate parents in the sexual health education of their queer children. This workshop will describe the preliminary work we have conducted with local parents and health experts to assist parents be better sexual health educators for GBQ adolescent sons.

Speakers:

Dalmacio Flores PhD
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Andre Rosario BSN, RN
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Self-Care practices are non-traditional and/or non-Medical techniques that promote a healthy body, mind and spirit. Self-care practices such as Yoga, Meditation, Active Movement, and Adult Play are alternative treatment therapies which can improve physical and mental health, decrease stress and boost the immune system. Participants will be able to engage in various self-care practices to promote overall well-being. First half of the workshop will include Yoga which combines physical postures, breathing exercises and relaxation practices and Meditation which is a practice that promotes relaxation. The second half of the workshop will include Active Movement a self-care practice of dancing and/or exercise and Adult Play to reduce stress and anxiety while promoting focus and self-expression.

Speakers:

Cynthia Vasquez NO
Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc.

Lorett Matus EdM
Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc.

As we grow older, we will likely reach a point in our lives where we need help taking care of ourselves. The aging process can impact our physical mobility, our memory, our cognitive functioning, and our ability to get around independently. Many older people living with HIV have lost significant portions of their support networks, leaving them with fewer options for who will care for them in their later years. Many are forced to grapple with the question of “Who is going to take care of me?”

In this workshop, we will discuss the process of preparing to be cared for and the steps we can take to plan for the types of care that we want to receive. We will explore the ways to mentally and emotionally prepare for receiving care and accepting the vulnerability that can come with asking for help and giving up some independence. We will talk about informal caregiving – supports provided by family, friends, and loved ones – as well as formal caregiving – supports provided by professionals in the home or in facilities. We will also discuss ways of creating new support networks after our networks have disappeared, strengthening the support that we can receive as we age.

Speakers:

Sarina Issenberg MSW
Lutheran Settlement House

Jim Orrell
LGBT Elder Initiative

Cheryl Clark
Philadelphia Corporation for Aging (PCA)

Philadelphia is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, which has affected the lives of many city residents. Drug overdoses killed 702 Philadelphians in 2015, 907 in 2016, and 1,217 in 2017. It is currently estimated that approximately 1,100 lives were lost during 2018. In 2017, more than 85% of drug deaths involved an opioid, and fentanyl is increasingly a contributing cause of death among overdose decedents. To address the opioid crisis in Philadelphia, the Philadelphia Department of Public Health launched the Opioid Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Prevention Program (OSEPP) in 2017. In this session, attendees will learn about the opioid epidemic in Philadelphia and the work OSEPP is conducting to help save lives.

Speakers:

Allison Herens MSW
Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Monica Sun MPH
Philadelphia Department of Public Health

This workshop is breaking the silence about anal wellness. Close to 50% of Americans engage in anal sex, but stigma and taboo beliefs often shut down discussion of how to incorporate safer sex practices into our anal sex activities. We are serious about securing the back door in this workshop. We will provide a safe place for engaging discussion between myths and facts, anal anatomy, and strategies people can incorporate to better protect themselves while enjoying anal sex.

Speakers:

Terri Clark MPH
Action Wellness

Steven Huizar
Philadelphia FIGHT

Personal lubricants can make sex play more comfortable, sensual, satisfying, and safe. As a rule, lube should be on the top of your list for sexy times. According to the CDC, using lube is a way to reduce your risk for acquiring and/or transmitting HIV/STIs. Many folks assume that lube is just for “aging, drying vaginas” or anal penetration; however, it could be the best kept secret to drastically improve your sex life and your sexual health. But how do you know which lube is the best for you? In this workshop, we will share what makes a good lube, how to use a lube, and what to consider in choosing a lube. Join the conversation and get in the know about lube.

Speakers:

Terri Clark MPH
Action Wellness

Emily Gus MPH
Philadelphia FIGHT

People living with HIV/AIDS smoke tobacco at a rate 2-3 times higher than the general population. For People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), smoking creates dire health consequences, including higher rates of certain cancers, lung infections, and cardiovascular disease and smoking creates a poorer response to anti-retroviral therapy. As a result, PLWHA who smoke lose more life years due to tobacco use than to HIV. Unfortunately, existing treatments for tobacco dependence are less effective among PLWHA. Moderated by Dr. Rebecca Ashare, this panel discussion will incorporate PLWHA, former smokers, and public health professionals to address why PLWHA smoke at higher rates, the specific tobacco-cessation treatment needs of this population, unique relapse risk factors, and tobacco prevention campaigns specific to the LGBTQ community. Dr. Robert Schnoll will discuss the current state of research on identifying factors that predict treatment response and developing more effective treatments for tobacco dependence among PLWHA, Mr. Bouknight will discuss his experience quitting smoking, and Jamie Magee, Sean McCormick and Atticus Ranck will discuss their tobacco prevention campaigns specific to the LGBTQ community.

Speakers:

Atticus Ranck M.A.
Bradbury-Sullivan LGBT Community Center

Rebecca Ashare PhD
University of Pennsylvania

Sean McCormick PhD, MS
Public Health Management Corporation

Robert Schnoll PhD
University of Pennsylvania

The HIV Prevention Department at Family and Community Service of Delaware County (FCSDC) intends to increase awareness about the international campaign, Undetectable=Untransmittable (U=U) that was created by Bruce Richman, the Founding Executive Director of the Prevention Access Campaign. U=U states that a person living with HIV who has an undetectable viral load CANNOT transmit HIV to their sexual partners. The team at FCSDC plans to provide information about U=U, discuss the importance of the campaign’s message, briefly touch on the research behind the campaign, and explore the audience’s thoughts through a group discussion. The Advocacy and Outreach Worker at FCSDC will also discuss her personal views on U=U and how it has impacted her as a person living with HIV/AIDS. FCSDC’s primary intention for this workshop is to spread awareness of the impact for maintaining an undetectable viral load, in the hope that we can reduce the stigma that persists towards the fear of HIV transmission.

Speakers:

Corinne Repko MSS
Family and Community Service of Delaware County

Emma Herman MSW, MEd
Family and Community Service of Delaware County

Janice Horan
Family and Community Service of Delaware County

Robert Neal
Family and Community Service of Delaware County

Mental health has always carried a stigma with it that affects those who have a mental health disorder that can stop those that need treatment from getting it. People living with HIV are twice as likely to suffer from depression as those that are not living with it. This workshop will discuss what can be done to lower the stigma of mental health, how this stigma doesn’t just affect those living with it and the perspective of someone living with a mental health disorder while also working in the HIV/mental health field.

Speakers:

Lupe Diaz
ACG

Kevin Moore PsyD
Accessible Recovery Services

Are you:

A health conscious individual who decided that you want to have sex, and unsure how to communicate about your desires and sexual health with your partner?

A health care professional/educator who is having trouble encouraging your patients/clients to uphold their preventative care by talking with their partners about STI testing and safer sex practices?

Both

If you said yes to any of the options above, then this is the workshop for you!

This interactive workshop is designed to give you the tools to have a candid conversation about your sexual health, desires, and safer sex practices with new and/or existing partners. We understand that it’s difficult, but necessary, to have a safer sex conversation. The goal is to empower participants by normalizing and practicing having conversations about consent, negotiating safer sex practices, and advocating for what you want in the bedroom in a simple and non-judgemental manner. We want to keep you as safe, informed, and sexy as possible!

When you are comfortable having these open conversations, about sex and sexual health, you help reduce the rate of HIV transmission and destigmatize conversations around disclosure. Not only will you be proactive about your health, but you will also cultivate a more trustworthy and intimate connection with your partner(s).

Speakers:

Janielle Bryan B.S. Public Health
Health Federation of Philadelphia

Nia Nchami Masters in Public Health
PDPH

Jazzmin Boyd B.S. Biochemistry
PDPH

This community focused workshop is designed to cover significant points of interest – as they connect the U=U Science and HIV Cure related Research. A panel featuring a prominent medical provider, a national U=U Advocate and a former HIV Cure Study Participant will address:

  • The impact of ATI {Analytical Treatment Interruption which is required of cure study participants} and how the ATI relates to the U=U Science-based Movement.
  • The role of our medical providers when we enroll in an HIV Cure related study.
  • Returning to an ARV treatment regiment, having participated in an HIV cure study.

Speakers:

Waheedah Shabazz-El
Beat HIV CAB/PWN-PA

Waheedah Shabazz-El
Beat HIV CAB/PWN-PA

William Freshwater CPA
Beat HIV CAB

Karam Mounzer MD
Philadelphia FIGHT

Teresa Sullivan
Beat HIV CAB/PWN-PA

The purpose of this workshop is to define sex work and discuss related issues such as trafficking, assault, the shortfalls of Dawn’s Court, legislation surrounding HIV/AIDS and sex work, as well as the oftentimes strained relationships between people who identify as sex workers and healthcare providers. This panel discussion will be moderated by Jefferson MPH students, while the panelists are members of Project SAFE and have firsthand insights into these complex topics. Through this discussion, we strive to correct misconceptions and address specific issues surrounding healthcare access and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

Speakers:

Cathy Lu
Thomas Jefferson University College of Population Health

In early 2016, people living with HIV organized with allies and researchers to communicate a life-changing but widely unknown and radical fact: a person living with HIV who has an undetectable viral load and is taking medication as prescribed cannot transmit HIV to sexual partners. In other words, Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U).

The U=U campaign began in the U.S. as a struggle for truth rooted in the principle that all people living with HIV have a right to accurate and meaningful information about their sexual and reproductive health. It grew into a community-driven global movement accepted by the international scientific and medical community, and reaching every key affected population in nearly 100 countries – and growing.

In this workshop, you’ll hear the inside story of how it started from some of the founders of the movement, and you’ll gain tools and strategies to communicate this game-changing message in meaningful ways in your communications, clinical, and advocacy work.

Speakers:

Cameron Kinker
Prevention Access Campaign

Transmission clusters can identify risk networks that are concerning because of ongoing

transmission, poor outcomes, or other reasons, such as transmission in a particularly vulnerable or

underserved population, or transmission of drug resistance. The first presentation will include an outline of our the PDPH uses data for public health action.

However, conducting this work comes with potential risks that include incidental disclosure, HIV criminalization, use of data without individual consent. The second presentation will include a presentation of the concerns (raised by community and a law expert). The third presentation will include a description of how the PDPH is responding to these concerns. This will be followed by a discussion led by a community member with audience questions to provide input into the local process.

Speakers:

Kathleen Brady MD
AIDS Activities Coordinating Office/Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Andre Ford
Penn CFAR CAB

Ronda Goldfein JD
AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvanai

Coleman Terrell
Philadelphia Department of Public Health/AACO

Philadelphia FIGHT (FIGHT) was founded as the Community-Based Research Initiative on AIDS as a partnership of individuals living with HIV/AIDS and clinicians who joined together to improve the lives of people living with the disease by testing potential treatments for HIV/AIDS and its complications. Today, FIGHT continues to strive to offer cutting edge research opportunities to the communities most effected by HIV through partnerships with pharmaceutical industry, the NIH, private corporations, and academic institutions across the greater Philadelphia area. In an effort to better engage the community, this interactive research “lab” activity offers potential participants the opportunity to speak with research professionals from various organizations about the parts of a trial, what to expect when enrolling in a research trial, what happens to blood and tissue samples after they are collected, how technology is used in research, etc. Summit attendees are encouraged to speak to each research professional, ask questions, and learn to interpret clinical trial information as it is presented to the public.

Speakers:

Linden Lalley-Chareczko MA
Philadelphia FIGHT

Emily Hiserodt
Philadelphia FIGHT

Randee Silverman
University of Pennsylvania

Hepatitis is known as the silent epidemic because it is so prevalent but so few people know their status. An estimated 50,000 Philadelphians have hepatitis C and at least 18% of HCV infected Philadelphians are co-infected with HIV. Whether you want to understand the basics of hep C, need to brush up on key hep C talking points, or are looking for answers to questions about hepatitis this workshop will give you an overview of hep C transmission, prevention and treatment. Learn about this epidemic, how it’s ongoing and the resources available. Come to this workshop for the info you need to be a hepatitis advocate and educator!

Speakers:

Christopher Boco
Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Priyanka Padidam BA
Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Zachary Pierre BS
Philadelphia Department of Public Health

The POSSE Project is a community-level intervention that adapted the Popular Opinion Leader intervention for use with House and Ball Communities (HBC) in Philadelphia and Chicago. POSSE has completed its data collection and will present some initial findings that will inform providers and the community about prevention and health promotion trends among HBC youth. Participants will hear from researchers and HBC members what we have learned and discuss how we can better serve this community to improve health outcomes.

Speakers:

Marne Castillo PhD
CHOP

Bevin Gwiazdowski MSW
CHOP

Richard Laboy
CHOP

Tori Gillis BA
CHOP

This workshop will include a discussion regarding communication between healthcare providers and those living with HIV/AIDS. Many patients are not sure of what they should be asking their doctors during appointments and how to navigate these interactions. The panelists will share their experiences as providers in the community and discuss techniques that they use to improve their communication with their patients. Attendees will learn about strategies to improve their communication skills including how to best prepare for appointments, what questions they should be asking, and how to be an advocate for themselves.

Speakers:

Carey Heck PhD, AGACNP-BC, CCRN, CNRN
Thomas Jefferson University

 

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Location Details

Pennsylvania Convention Center

Location Address

13th and Arch Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19103

Spotlight On

Karam Mounzer, MD

Dr. Mounzer identified two major gaps in the care of patients with HIV/hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection, and the complexity of multidrug-resistant HIV treatment. He is involved with many clinical trials focusing on drug development and better understanding of HIV immunopathogenesis with the Wistar Institute. He is involved in teaching and mentoring.

Learn More about Spotlight On
Dr. Karam Mounzer

Dr. Mario Cruz

Dr. Mario CruzDr. Cruz is a board certified pediatrician who joins Philadelphia FIGHT as the Medical Director for our Pediatrics and Adolescent Health Center. He completed his undergraduate training in Biology and Psychology from Union College, his medical school training at Albany Medical College, his residency training at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, and his Chief Residency at the Albert Einstein Medical Center.


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